Lyle Owerko Boomboxes and Eagle Hunters
Lyle Owerko
Boomboxes and Eagle Hunters July 15 - September 3, 2016

Acclaimed photographer and filmmaker Lyle Owerko’s new series, Eagle Hunters, explores the ancient and otherwise closed communities dependent on the world’s most dangerous bird of prey. Shot over a period of two years in Northern Mongolia, this striking body of work reveals a timeless and surreal beauty, juxtaposed against a desolate landscape.

Also on view will be a selection of new work from Owerko’s ongoing series, The Boombox Project. Owerko’s evocative, large-scale photographs of these distinctive American touchstones are an exercise in cultural anthropology, celebrating the visual history of an object central to the major pop-cultural moments of the 20th century, from hip-hop to punk and new wave.  A continuation of his architectural, highly detailed photographs published in the 2010 book The Boombox Project: The Machines, the Music, and the Urban Underground, Owerko has brought the youth culture of the city streets into the gallery space.

Lyle Owerko is a photographer and filmmaker widely recognized for his photograph Second Plane, which captures the second plane crashing into the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001. It was ranked by the American Society of Magazine Editors as one of the 40 most important magazine covers of the last 40 years. In 2010 he was named a "Hasselblad Master" for his work in fine art photojournalism. His work is included in the permanent archive of the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., and the V&A in London, where part of his Boombox collection resides in the permanent archive of 20th century historically significant objects.

Lyle Owerko is a photographer and filmmaker widely recognized for his photograph Second Plane, which captures the second plane crashing into the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001. It was ranked by the American Society of Magazine Editors as one of the 40 most important magazine covers of the last 40 years. In 2010 he was named a "Hasselblad Master" for his work in fine art photojournalism. His work is included in the permanent archive of the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., and the V&A in London, where part of his Boombox collection resides in the permanent archive of 20th century historically significant objects.

 

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