Paris versus Shanghai: photo fairs old and new compared Despite censorship, China’s appetite for photography is growing but Paris Photo remains pre-eminent
Paris versus Shanghai: photo fairs old and new compared
Despite censorship, China’s appetite for photography is growing but Paris Photo remains pre-eminent
Paris versus Shanghai: photo fairs old and new compared Despite censorship, China’s appetite for photography is growing but Paris Photo remains pre-eminent
Paris versus Shanghai: photo fairs old and new compared
Despite censorship, China’s appetite for photography is growing but Paris Photo remains pre-eminent

This month, the 22nd edition of Paris Photo (8-11 November) kicks off in the Grand Palais with 196 exhibitors—and an eclectic programme of talks, events, film screenings and photography exhibitions throughout the city, not to mention an established auction series.

On the other side of the world, a much younger fair affords a comparison of photography markets old and new. Photofairs Shanghai marked its fifth anniversary in September with 55 exhibitors, a much smaller affair but one that is developing well. It is one of two fairs run by the London-based World Photography Organisation (the other being in San Francisco) and, according to Georgia Griffiths, the group fair director, since Shanghai launched in 2014, four major museums dedicated to photography have opened in China. “We believe photography is part of the key to the future of the Chinese art market,” she says.

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